Thoughtful musings on various topics by interesting people at Blithewold

Gone to Seed

While the light changes and we keep up with the last deadheading of the season, seeds begin to appear in the garden.  They are everywhere, in every shape and size.  Each plant has its own … Read more.

Awakening spring

This week the temperatures softened just enough to keep spring from hitting the snooze button again and made being outside in the gardens totally irresistible. We didn’t leave a lot in the Rose or North Gardens to … Read more.

Learn something new — on fertilization

When we get busy I’m apt to forget my quest to learn something new every day. But during the winter we have the time and plenty of opportunities in the way of classes, lectures, symposiums, … Read more.

Goodnight gardens

After some festive weeks spent preparing for our Christmas display and this week’s wreath workshops, it was pure pleasure to be out in the gardens again. Despite the chill that crept into fingers and toes. Earlier … Read more.

Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

You’ve probably heard of the Slow Food movement. I don’t think I know anyone who hasn’t been making a conscious shift away from processed (fast) food to local, seasonable, sustainable whole-food sources. We’re eager to … Read more.

A rabbit’s eye view with Noel Kingsbury

We are so lucky that yesterday’s rain held off just long enough to take a ground-level tour of Blithewold’s gardens with British garden designer/plantsman/author, Noel Kingsbury. He showed us, plant by plant, exactly what to look … Read more.

Mid-June shout out and product review

I’m jumping the gun on Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day but I can’t let a week like this one go by without crowing about Blithewold’s gardens — especially the Rose and North Gardens. Actually, I’ll let … Read more.

100 Plants per hour

It’s not even June yet but it’s already planting week (month) at Blithewold. We hit the ground digging this week, clocking about 100 plants per hour. It’s not a competition but like every May/June we … Read more.

Bring on spring

We’ve made room in the propagating house for trays of seedlings. We’ve ordered new tools and can’t wait to use them. We’re ready. Raring to go. Fingers tapping. Meanwhile, there’s nothing better than a bucket … Read more.

“A Rich Spot of Earth”

Until yesterday I had no idea that Thomas Jefferson was the first American to grow rutabaga. According to Peter Hatch, recently retired director of Monticello’s gardens and grounds, author of “A Rich Spot of Earth”: … Read more.